The Intersection of Indigenous Communities and Modern Research

As researchers from the Permafrost Laboratory at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, Dr. Alexander Kholodov and Dr. Santosh Panda work in some of the most difficult to access rural communities in the Alaskan interior.

Preparing For The Arctic: Field Training For Field Success

With a team of polar experts who specialize in planning and implementing field logistics, Polar Field Services (PFS) plays a critical role in preparing researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) for a successful field season.

Endangered Archaeology: Climate Change May Swallow History

When John Darwent returned to a remote corner of northwestern Greenland in 2012 to search for the remains of a paleo-Inuit culture that had occupied the area millennia ago, he found the site dramatically changed.

Mapping Community Exposure to Coastal Hazards in Alaska

Communities along the far northern coastlines of Alaska are witnessing some of the highest erosion rates in the world. Less and less sea ice cover results in the direct exposure of coastal soils to the destructive blunt force of powerful wave energy.

Arctic Grayling May Find It Hard to Go with the Flow Due to Climate Change

When Mark Urban and his team of biologists arrived in the foothills of Alaska’s Brooks Range last May, for example, they were disconcerted to see tundra green and not the lingering snowfields of winter. 

Digging for clues: The wreck of the NEVA

“Lands beneath the bow!” The shouted warning wakes the captain of the Russian frigate, NEVA, from his afternoon nap as the ship runs aground in narrow, cliff-bounded Sitka Sound.

NEON Alaska Comes On Line

The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a large-scale project funded by the National Science Foundation to document ecological changes across the U.S. over the next three decades. We wanted to check in to learn more about NEON and the exciting work underway in Alaska.

In the News - June 5, 2015

In the News - June 5, 2015

The Christian Science Monitor reports the findings of a study published June 3 in Nature that investigates how large glacial lakes in Greenland can completely drain billions of gallons of water in a matter of hours.

A Cross-Country Journey to Study Sea Ice Structure

A Cross-Country Journey to Study Sea Ice Structure

A group of scientists are in the final stretch of a two-month journey to collect sea ice cores in Barrow Alaska and return to them to their home base in New Hampshire to study their three-dimensional pore structure.

Welcome home, R/V Sikuliaq

The NSF's newest ocean-going laboratory, the R/V Sikuliaq, last week arrived in her home port of Seward, AK. As part of her welcome home, the ship was open for public tours.

In the News - March 5, 2015

In the News - March 5, 2015

News about the polar regions abounds recently, with stories ranging from new data on thinning Arctic sea ice to an exposition on the life of the Arctic scientist on location in Greenland. Here’s a round up for your reading pleasure.

Studying Algae and Kelp Forests for Clues on Ocean Acidification

Studying Algae and Kelp Forests for Clues on Ocean Acidification

Each year, oceans absorb about 25 percent of the carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere, and this absorbed CO2 fundamentally changes seawater chemistry by creating a more acidic marine environment. The consequences of this acidification are felt—often significantly—by many marine organisms.

Gender, Environment and Change in the Arctic

Gender, Environment and Change in the Arctic

Indigenous communities in the Arctic are facing a lot of pressure. The region is warming twice as fast as other parts of the world, with significant impacts to the Arctic ecosystem.

Tradition & Science: The Yakutat Seal Camps Project

Tradition & Science: The Yakutat Seal Camps Project

Dr. Aron Crowell, Alaska Director of the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center, is contributing to the debate with his own anthropological findings from a research project in Alaska that’s searching for (and finding) archaeological sites using oral history as a guide.

Arctic In the News

Arctic In the News

The United States' last vessel capable of breaking through the heaviest ice of the Arctic Circle, and resupplying the U.S. polar research station there, is scheduled to leave San Francisco Bay on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014.

Looking to Plants For Cultural Insight

Looking to Plants For Cultural Insight

When ethnobotanist Kevin Jernigan traveled to the Russian Far East this summer to launch a comparative study on the medical ethnobotany of two related but separate Arctic cultures, he went with an ambitious goal.

Active Layer Soil & Permafrost in a Warming World

Active Layer Soil & Permafrost in a Warming World

Those seeking to understand how warmer temperatures on the North Slope of Alaska and other regions may increase the impacts of climate change need look no further than the ground beneath their feet.