Couldn't Get Much Higher

Benign weather last week led to perfect conditions for launching instrumented balloons at the NSF-funded research station in the middle of Greenland's ice sheet. We heard from science technicians at Summit, Marci Beitch (PFS) and Jason Johns (NOAA), who were suitably impressed by the flight.

Arctic In the News

Arctic In the News

The United States' last vessel capable of breaking through the heaviest ice of the Arctic Circle, and resupplying the U.S. polar research station there, is scheduled to leave San Francisco Bay on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014.

Active Layer Soil & Permafrost in a Warming World

Active Layer Soil & Permafrost in a Warming World

Those seeking to understand how warmer temperatures on the North Slope of Alaska and other regions may increase the impacts of climate change need look no further than the ground beneath their feet.

In the News - October 16, 2014

In the News - October 16, 2014

Alaska Public Radio reported that when the new National Science Foundation research vessel Sikuliaq launches in a few months, it will be equipped with about a half-dozen Arctic Native ice testing sticks.

Climate change and polar bears

This week, world leaders met in New York for the U.N. Climate Summit to advance climate action. Concurrently, the New York Times and other media outlets published a series of stories and video about the impacts of a warming Arctic.

In the News - August 13, 2014

In the News - August 13, 2014

The Voice of Russia reports that scientists in Denmark discovered three Bluefin tuna in the chilly waters off the east coast of Greenland in 2012, an unusual find given that Bluefin tuna typically hail from the Mediterranean and the Gulf Coast of Mexico and are found in warmer climes.

Arctic Lakes Store More Greenhouse Gases Than They Emit

Arctic Lakes Store More Greenhouse Gases Than They Emit

New research published this month indicates that some Arctic lakes store more greenhouse gases than they emit, effectively working to cool the climate instead of warming it. The study, led by Katey Walter Anthony (University of Alaska, Fairbanks), was published in the journal Nature.

Monitoring Arctic sea ice thickness

To best understand climate change processes and their impacts, scientists monitor changes in the volume or mass of the Arctic sea ice cover. Specifically, researchers keep close tabs on the ice extent, or the area covered by sea ice, and ice thickness.

2014 Sea Ice Outlook: July Report

2014 Sea Ice Outlook: July Report

Since 2008, the annual Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) has provided an open process for those interested in arctic sea ice to share ideas about the September minimum sea ice extent. This year (2014) represents a transition for the SIO, as it is now managed as part of the Sea Ice Prediction Network.

Greenland Clouds Offer Clues to Possible Climate Change Impacts

Greenland Clouds Offer Clues to Possible Climate Change Impacts

On a cold, crisp day hundreds of clouds drift over the Greenland Ice Sheet. These clouds play an important role in the region’s energy balance, affecting everything from air temperature to ice melt and precipitation.

Intermediate Drill Set to Procure Antarctic Ice Cores

In Mark Twickler’s world, “small” is relative. When it comes to a new ice core drill that’s being developed and tested by a team of specialized engineers from the Ice Drilling Design and Operations group (IDDO), small means about 20,000 pounds.

Get Ready for the Polaris Project 2014

Flowers, garden vegetables, sunshine, and…summer science cargo. That’s what’s been on the minds of Sue Natali, Polaris Project Research Coordinator and Assistant Scientist at the Woods Hole Research Center, and John Schade, Polaris Project Education Coordinator.

Summit Station: Halos, Flakes, Apparitions

Our team at Summit Station has been offering glimpses of the light show they're witnessing as the north polar region slips into darkness. These optical effects are caused by light bending through ice crystals.

Carbon below the Surface

Penn State biologist Eric Post realized that a significant amount of activity that influenced the arctic ecosystem was taking place underground. He is in the process of studying the underground carbon exchange in Greenland's tundra.

In the News - August 9, 2013

From ancient populations to modern-day impacts of the loss of sea ice, the National Science Foundation-sponsored research we help support here at Polar Field Services is often in the media. Here’s a round up of recent stories.

Dark Snow Project Explores Wildfires and Arctic Melt

Dr. Jason Box is asking for public donations to finance a research trip to Greenland to study the impact of wildfire ash on Arctic albedo. P

Snow pack critical driver in regulation of Arctic atmosphere

The unprecedented Arctic warming over the past 30 years is leading to melting of sea ice and consequences. Now scientists have evidence that Arctic warming could also change atmospheric chemistry through reactions that occur between the air and the snow.