Arctic Grayling May Find It Hard to Go with the Flow Due to Climate Change

When Mark Urban and his team of biologists arrived in the foothills of Alaska’s Brooks Range last May, for example, they were disconcerted to see tundra green and not the lingering snowfields of winter. 

Skeeter Science in the Arctic

Lauren Culler is having a hard time finding anyone to work with her. Perhaps it’s because scientists, who travel to the remotest regions, braving the most bruising conditions to unravel almost any mystery, aren’t too keen on facing Culler’s chosen subject of research: the mosquito.

NEON Alaska Comes On Line

The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a large-scale project funded by the National Science Foundation to document ecological changes across the U.S. over the next three decades. We wanted to check in to learn more about NEON and the exciting work underway in Alaska.

In the News - June 5, 2015

In the News - June 5, 2015

The Christian Science Monitor reports the findings of a study published June 3 in Nature that investigates how large glacial lakes in Greenland can completely drain billions of gallons of water in a matter of hours.

Studying Algae and Kelp Forests for Clues on Ocean Acidification

Studying Algae and Kelp Forests for Clues on Ocean Acidification

Each year, oceans absorb about 25 percent of the carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere, and this absorbed CO2 fundamentally changes seawater chemistry by creating a more acidic marine environment. The consequences of this acidification are felt—often significantly—by many marine organisms.

Arctic In the News

Arctic In the News

The United States' last vessel capable of breaking through the heaviest ice of the Arctic Circle, and resupplying the U.S. polar research station there, is scheduled to leave San Francisco Bay on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014.

Recap: Joint Science Education Project 2014

Recap: Joint Science Education Project 2014

Earlier this summer, Lynn Foshee Reed, organizer of Arctic Science Education Week, sent us a recap of the Joint Science Education Project (JSEP) 2014.

A (Dalton) Highway Runs Through It

Throughout Skip Walker’s 40 plus years of working in Arctic Alaska he’s kept his feet, and his research, firmly planted on and near the Dalton Highway. Walker, Director of the University of Alaska’s Alaska Geobotany Center, first visited Arctic Alaska in 1969 while working on an oil rig.

In the News - August 13, 2014

In the News - August 13, 2014

The Voice of Russia reports that scientists in Denmark discovered three Bluefin tuna in the chilly waters off the east coast of Greenland in 2012, an unusual find given that Bluefin tuna typically hail from the Mediterranean and the Gulf Coast of Mexico and are found in warmer climes.

Arctic Lakes Store More Greenhouse Gases Than They Emit

Arctic Lakes Store More Greenhouse Gases Than They Emit

New research published this month indicates that some Arctic lakes store more greenhouse gases than they emit, effectively working to cool the climate instead of warming it. The study, led by Katey Walter Anthony (University of Alaska, Fairbanks), was published in the journal Nature.

Follow Islands of the Four Mountains fieldwork in real time

Follow Islands of the Four Mountains fieldwork in real time

Learn more about the fascinating research project of Dixie West and Virginia Hatfield (Kansas University), Kirsten Nicolaysen (Whitman College) and Breanyn MacInnes (Central Washington University) in Alaska’s central Aleutians, one of the most inhospitable environments a person could imagine.

2014 Sea Ice Outlook: July Report

2014 Sea Ice Outlook: July Report

Since 2008, the annual Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) has provided an open process for those interested in arctic sea ice to share ideas about the September minimum sea ice extent. This year (2014) represents a transition for the SIO, as it is now managed as part of the Sea Ice Prediction Network.

Film makers follow the sea ice in search of whales

Film makers follow the sea ice in search of whales

Each year, bowhead whales migrate in the Bering, Beaufort, and Chukchi Seas. Their voyage is testament to their endurance and provides a peek into the marine ecosystems of whales and zooplankton, and all of the elements that influence movement through subarctic and arctic waters.

Get Ready for the Polaris Project 2014

Flowers, garden vegetables, sunshine, and…summer science cargo. That’s what’s been on the minds of Sue Natali, Polaris Project Research Coordinator and Assistant Scientist at the Woods Hole Research Center, and John Schade, Polaris Project Education Coordinator.

The Mystery of the Arctic Ground Squirrel’s Biological Clock

Arctic ground squirrels may not be as flashy as some other inhabitants of the arctic ecosystem. But what they lack in charisma, they make up for with unique adaptations that help them survive and thrive in one of the toughest environments on Earth.

Studying the role of Arctic sea ice

Studying the role of Arctic sea ice

The sea ice in northern Alaska is teeming with many species of algae. These algae form a key part of the Arctic food web, providing a valuable food source to organisms at the foundation of the food chain.

Emerging vegetation offers climate clues as ice retreats

Associate Professor Jason Briner and Gifford Miller, Fellow and Associate Director of University of Colorado’s Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, are analyzing fossilized Arctic moss that has been buried under ice for thousands of years to garner clues about the region's climate history.

How Climate Change Impacts Alaskan Ecosystems

The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in western Alaska is the stage for a three-year experiment to explore the connections between a changing climate, an advancing growing season, migratory geese and the chemical processes that impact the broader ecosystem.

The Secret Life of Parasitic Sea Ice Fungi

Arctic sea ice is teeming with life, much of which is a mystery. Scientists know a lot about organisms like glassy diatoms, chlorophyll-rich algae and whipping flagellates who call sea ice home. But little is known about another component of the icy microcosm: parasitic fungi.