Couldn't Get Much Higher

Benign weather last week led to perfect conditions for launching instrumented balloons at the NSF-funded research station in the middle of Greenland's ice sheet. We heard from science technicians at Summit, Marci Beitch (PFS) and Jason Johns (NOAA), who were suitably impressed by the flight.

In the News - June 5, 2015

In the News - June 5, 2015

The Christian Science Monitor reports the findings of a study published June 3 in Nature that investigates how large glacial lakes in Greenland can completely drain billions of gallons of water in a matter of hours.

Studying the Glaciers' Margins

Studying the Glaciers' Margins

Nicolás Young at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and colleagues Joerg Schaefer, Jason Briner and Gifford Miller want to know just how sensitive the Laurentide Ice Sheet and the Greenland Ice Sheet are to climate perturbations.

Lessons from an Arctic Lake

Lessons from an Arctic Lake

When middle school earth science teacher Tim Martin joined a team of scientists on a 2009 PolarTREC expedition to the far northern reaches of Siberia, he hoped that the exotic experience would yield lessons relevant to his students at Greensboro Day School.

A Cross-Country Journey to Study Sea Ice Structure

A Cross-Country Journey to Study Sea Ice Structure

A group of scientists are in the final stretch of a two-month journey to collect sea ice cores in Barrow Alaska and return to them to their home base in New Hampshire to study their three-dimensional pore structure.

Active Layer Soil & Permafrost in a Warming World

Active Layer Soil & Permafrost in a Warming World

Those seeking to understand how warmer temperatures on the North Slope of Alaska and other regions may increase the impacts of climate change need look no further than the ground beneath their feet.

Greenland's Freshwater Lakes & Climate Change Impacts

Last year, Field Notes introduced you to Jasmine Saros, a lake ecologist from the University of Maine investigating if tiny freshwater diatoms can offer clues on what impact climate change may have on Arctic freshwater lake ecosystems.

Climate change and polar bears

This week, world leaders met in New York for the U.N. Climate Summit to advance climate action. Concurrently, the New York Times and other media outlets published a series of stories and video about the impacts of a warming Arctic.

Unlocking the Past for Clues to the Future of Greenland’s Ice Sheet

Unlocking the Past for Clues to the Future of Greenland’s Ice Sheet

What can the past tell us about the future? That’s the question ice core specialist Erich Osterberg and a team of scientists is trying to answer. Their project, Response of the Northwest Greenland Cryosphere to Holocene Climate Change, is supported by the National Science Foundation.

Recap: Joint Science Education Project 2014

Recap: Joint Science Education Project 2014

Earlier this summer, Lynn Foshee Reed, organizer of Arctic Science Education Week, sent us a recap of the Joint Science Education Project (JSEP) 2014.

In the News - August 13, 2014

In the News - August 13, 2014

The Voice of Russia reports that scientists in Denmark discovered three Bluefin tuna in the chilly waters off the east coast of Greenland in 2012, an unusual find given that Bluefin tuna typically hail from the Mediterranean and the Gulf Coast of Mexico and are found in warmer climes.

Follow Islands of the Four Mountains fieldwork in real time

Follow Islands of the Four Mountains fieldwork in real time

Learn more about the fascinating research project of Dixie West and Virginia Hatfield (Kansas University), Kirsten Nicolaysen (Whitman College) and Breanyn MacInnes (Central Washington University) in Alaska’s central Aleutians, one of the most inhospitable environments a person could imagine.

Pics from the Field: SolarBee in Southwestern Greenland

Pics from the Field: SolarBee in Southwestern Greenland

Ecologist Jasmine Saros (University of Maine, Orono) and her team of researchers are studying diatoms in lakes in southwestern Greenland to understand how climate change is affecting this Arctic ecosystem.

Intermediate Drill Set to Procure Antarctic Ice Cores

In Mark Twickler’s world, “small” is relative. When it comes to a new ice core drill that’s being developed and tested by a team of specialized engineers from the Ice Drilling Design and Operations group (IDDO), small means about 20,000 pounds.

View from the Field: Erich Osterberg in Denali, AK

Sharing information about the research we help support is an exciting part of our role as a National Science Foundation logistics provider, and this time of year, it's difficult to keep up with all the news coming from the field.

GrIT Update: Nearly Home

The GrIT operations team is nearly “home.” After making impressive mileage all last week, the team was approximately a day away from Thule, according to Project Manager Geoff Philips. All indications suggest the team will reach Thule Monday, June 2.

Emerging vegetation offers climate clues as ice retreats

Associate Professor Jason Briner and Gifford Miller, Fellow and Associate Director of University of Colorado’s Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, are analyzing fossilized Arctic moss that has been buried under ice for thousands of years to garner clues about the region's climate history.

GrIT Update: Homeward Bound

Good travel conditions and a lack of mechanical issues has made for smooth travels for the Greenland Inland Traverse (GrIT) team as it makes its way back to Thule.

Moving Summit Station's Mobile Science Facility

The Mobile Science Facility at Summit Station was constructed by the National Science Foundation to rest on skis so that it could be repositioned and relocated. Occasionally it is moved to suit the needs of the experiment(s) it contains.