A Cross-Country Journey to Study Sea Ice Structure

A Cross-Country Journey to Study Sea Ice Structure

A group of scientists are in the final stretch of a two-month journey to collect sea ice cores in Barrow Alaska and return to them to their home base in New Hampshire to study their three-dimensional pore structure.

Welcome home, R/V Sikuliaq

The NSF's newest ocean-going laboratory, the R/V Sikuliaq, last week arrived in her home port of Seward, AK. As part of her welcome home, the ship was open for public tours.

In the News - October 16, 2014

In the News - October 16, 2014

Alaska Public Radio reported that when the new National Science Foundation research vessel Sikuliaq launches in a few months, it will be equipped with about a half-dozen Arctic Native ice testing sticks.

In the News - August 13, 2014

In the News - August 13, 2014

The Voice of Russia reports that scientists in Denmark discovered three Bluefin tuna in the chilly waters off the east coast of Greenland in 2012, an unusual find given that Bluefin tuna typically hail from the Mediterranean and the Gulf Coast of Mexico and are found in warmer climes.

Monitoring Arctic sea ice thickness

To best understand climate change processes and their impacts, scientists monitor changes in the volume or mass of the Arctic sea ice cover. Specifically, researchers keep close tabs on the ice extent, or the area covered by sea ice, and ice thickness.

2014 Sea Ice Outlook: July Report

2014 Sea Ice Outlook: July Report

Since 2008, the annual Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) has provided an open process for those interested in arctic sea ice to share ideas about the September minimum sea ice extent. This year (2014) represents a transition for the SIO, as it is now managed as part of the Sea Ice Prediction Network.

Science with Seals

We’ve been following the adventures of oceanographer and mathematician, David Holland and his wife Denise, logistical right-hand and project documentarian, during their Greenlandic adventures. We caught up with them via email during their recent transit between Abu Dhabi and Ilulissat.

Film makers follow the sea ice in search of whales

Film makers follow the sea ice in search of whales

Each year, bowhead whales migrate in the Bering, Beaufort, and Chukchi Seas. Their voyage is testament to their endurance and provides a peek into the marine ecosystems of whales and zooplankton, and all of the elements that influence movement through subarctic and arctic waters.

Get Ready for the Polaris Project 2014

Flowers, garden vegetables, sunshine, and…summer science cargo. That’s what’s been on the minds of Sue Natali, Polaris Project Research Coordinator and Assistant Scientist at the Woods Hole Research Center, and John Schade, Polaris Project Education Coordinator.

Exploring Greenland’s Supraglacial Lakes & Sarqardleq Fjord

Exploring Greenland’s Supraglacial Lakes & Sarqardleq Fjord

Laura Stevens has had several busy summers studying west Greenland’s Sarqardliup Glacier. Located south of Ilulissat, the glacier’s Sarqardleq Fjord connects with the Jakobshavn Glacier, one of Greenland’s fastest moving and most productive glaciers in terms of iceberg yield.

Studying the role of Arctic sea ice

Studying the role of Arctic sea ice

The sea ice in northern Alaska is teeming with many species of algae. These algae form a key part of the Arctic food web, providing a valuable food source to organisms at the foundation of the food chain.

Exploring Fisheries Management and Livelihoods in Iceland

Strong fisheries coupled with Iceland's unique fisheries management system makes it a perfect place to explore questions of how people, their families, interests and finances are all connected to fishing and management strategies.

News Report: R/V Sikuliaq Delayed by Mechanical Problems

The Seward City News reports that during trial runs for the R/V Sikuliaq, the National Science Foundation's $200 million Arctic research vessel, the ship lost proper lubrication in its starboard propulsion unit.

Understanding ice-ocean interactions in west Greenland

For years, scientists have understood that Greenland's ice sheet contributes to rising sea levels through the combination of surface melting and accelerating outlet glaciers. What’s less understood is the behavior of different glaciers in different locations.

New study shows differing polar bear response to ice melt

As Arctic ice continues to melt at historic rates, scientists are studying the ecological impacts of the changing landscape, including on the impact of shrinking sea ice on polar bear populations. A recent story on Alaska Public Radio offered the following insights.

In the News - August 22, 2013

Arctic climate science has been in the news a lot lately; here are some of the highlights.

Polar Careers: Rob Robbins, polar diver

The first time Rob Robbins, Supervisor of Dive Services at Antarctica’s McMurdo Station set his eyes on the ice in 1979 he fell in love. Now he is one of two full-time divers working at McMurdo Station in Antarctica.

Polar careers: Norway’s ‘Ice Man’

Most mornings, Chris Petrich’s biggest hurdle is staying off the ski lift he passes on his way to work in Northern Norway. But the scientist resists the temptation and continues to the Northern Research Institute Narvik, where he investigates the melting and breakup of Arctic ice.

Snow pack critical driver in regulation of Arctic atmosphere

The unprecedented Arctic warming over the past 30 years is leading to melting of sea ice and consequences. Now scientists have evidence that Arctic warming could also change atmospheric chemistry through reactions that occur between the air and the snow.