Three field seasons in four minutes

Check out this fun video highlighting the field glaciology portion of a multi-institutional, interdisciplinary project focused on ice-ocean interaction in west Greenland.

Digging for clues: The wreck of the NEVA

“Lands beneath the bow!” The shouted warning wakes the captain of the Russian frigate, NEVA, from his afternoon nap as the ship runs aground in narrow, cliff-bounded Sitka Sound.

Geek out at the Polar Technology Conference

The 12th Annual Polar Technology Conference is bringing together scientists and engineers to exchange information, ideas and solutions on deploying research systems in polar environments.

Skeeter Science in the Arctic

Lauren Culler is having a hard time finding anyone to work with her. Perhaps it’s because scientists, who travel to the remotest regions, braving the most bruising conditions to unravel almost any mystery, aren’t too keen on facing Culler’s chosen subject of research: the mosquito.

Student polar adventure: Apply now!

The Joint Science Education Project (JSEP) and the Joint Antarctic School Expedition (JASE) are National Science Foundation supported science and cultural exchange programs for high school students. The three-week JSEP program takes place entirely in Greenland.

Phase Change at Summit Station

When the NSF research station closed for the season in mid-August, staff spent the next weeks putting a summer's worth of equipment and infrastructure to bed while supporting experiments that run year round.

Looking Back to Understand Coming Conditions

After more than a decade of international coordination and planning, scientists are off to examine the remote Petermann Glacier region in Northwestern Greenland. Tag along via the team's blog and social media!

NEON Alaska Comes On Line

The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a large-scale project funded by the National Science Foundation to document ecological changes across the U.S. over the next three decades. We wanted to check in to learn more about NEON and the exciting work underway in Alaska.

GROVER 2.0—No Ordinary Polar Robot

GROVER 2.0—No Ordinary Polar Robot

Collecting data in the Arctic and Antarctic can be dangerous, expensive and logistically challenging. GROVER was built to help scientists collect data remotely no matter what conditions the polar environment has in store for it.

In the News - June 5, 2015

In the News - June 5, 2015

The Christian Science Monitor reports the findings of a study published June 3 in Nature that investigates how large glacial lakes in Greenland can completely drain billions of gallons of water in a matter of hours.

GrIT relocates Danish Research Station

GrIT relocates Danish Research Station

Successful world-class science sometimes requires moving metaphorical mountains. But the National Science Foundation (NSF) recently provided some of the machine muscle to literally move a 47-ton Danish research station across the Greenland ice sheet.

Scenes from Smithsonian's Arctic Spring Festival

Scenes from Smithsonian's Arctic Spring Festival

Field Notes frequent contributor Alicia Clarke checked out the Arctic Spring Festival last weekend and offered this snapshot of the event. Check out our photos here!

Studying the Glaciers' Margins

Studying the Glaciers' Margins

Nicolás Young at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and colleagues Joerg Schaefer, Jason Briner and Gifford Miller want to know just how sensitive the Laurentide Ice Sheet and the Greenland Ice Sheet are to climate perturbations.

Smithsonian Celebrates Arctic Culture & Science

Smithsonian Celebrates Arctic Culture & Science

This weekend, crowds will flock to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. to learn about all things Arctic. The Arctic Spring Festival, May 8-10, 2015, will celebrate the people, cultures and science of the region.

Lessons from an Arctic Lake

Lessons from an Arctic Lake

When middle school earth science teacher Tim Martin joined a team of scientists on a 2009 PolarTREC expedition to the far northern reaches of Siberia, he hoped that the exotic experience would yield lessons relevant to his students at Greensboro Day School.

A Cross-Country Journey to Study Sea Ice Structure

A Cross-Country Journey to Study Sea Ice Structure

A group of scientists are in the final stretch of a two-month journey to collect sea ice cores in Barrow Alaska and return to them to their home base in New Hampshire to study their three-dimensional pore structure.

Sharing Knowledge, Sharing the Planet

NSF-funded geologist Jason Briner went to China earlier this month to discuss his Arctic research. Virtually, that is. Jason attended a Skype session with fifth-grade students at The International School of Tianjin, an International Baccalaureate (IB) school in Tianjin, China.