Welcome home, R/V Sikuliaq

The NSF's newest ocean-going laboratory, the R/V Sikuliaq, last week arrived in her home port of Seward, AK. As part of her welcome home, the ship was open for public tours.

In the News - March 5, 2015

In the News - March 5, 2015

News about the polar regions abounds recently, with stories ranging from new data on thinning Arctic sea ice to an exposition on the life of the Arctic scientist on location in Greenland. Here’s a round up for your reading pleasure.

Studying Algae and Kelp Forests for Clues on Ocean Acidification

Studying Algae and Kelp Forests for Clues on Ocean Acidification

Each year, oceans absorb about 25 percent of the carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere, and this absorbed CO2 fundamentally changes seawater chemistry by creating a more acidic marine environment. The consequences of this acidification are felt—often significantly—by many marine organisms.

Gender, Environment and Change in the Arctic

Gender, Environment and Change in the Arctic

Indigenous communities in the Arctic are facing a lot of pressure. The region is warming twice as fast as other parts of the world, with significant impacts to the Arctic ecosystem.

GEOFON: Studying seismology around the world

GEOFON: Studying seismology around the world

Last fall we talked with Winfried Hanka (GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam) via email about the GEOFON Seismic Network, a global broadband seismic network operated and maintained by GFZ since 1993.

Tradition & Science: The Yakutat Seal Camps Project

Tradition & Science: The Yakutat Seal Camps Project

Dr. Aron Crowell, Alaska Director of the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center, is contributing to the debate with his own anthropological findings from a research project in Alaska that’s searching for (and finding) archaeological sites using oral history as a guide.

What is JSEP?

What is the Joint Science Education Project (JSEP)? JSEP is a collaborative effort to educate and inspire the next generation of polar scientists and is authorized by the Joint Committee, a diplomatic coalition of the United States, Greenland and Denmark.

Arctic In the News

Arctic In the News

The United States' last vessel capable of breaking through the heaviest ice of the Arctic Circle, and resupplying the U.S. polar research station there, is scheduled to leave San Francisco Bay on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014.

Looking to Plants For Cultural Insight

Looking to Plants For Cultural Insight

When ethnobotanist Kevin Jernigan traveled to the Russian Far East this summer to launch a comparative study on the medical ethnobotany of two related but separate Arctic cultures, he went with an ambitious goal.

Active Layer Soil & Permafrost in a Warming World

Active Layer Soil & Permafrost in a Warming World

Those seeking to understand how warmer temperatures on the North Slope of Alaska and other regions may increase the impacts of climate change need look no further than the ground beneath their feet.

Greenland's Freshwater Lakes & Climate Change Impacts

Last year, Field Notes introduced you to Jasmine Saros, a lake ecologist from the University of Maine investigating if tiny freshwater diatoms can offer clues on what impact climate change may have on Arctic freshwater lake ecosystems.

Collaborative research focuses on Alaskan fisheries, environment

Cultural anthropologists Karen Hébert and Danielle DiNovelli-Lang recently began a three-year project funded by the National Science Foundation to investigate relationships and perspectives on climate, environment and economic crisis in two of Alaska’s rural subarctic communities.

In the News - October 16, 2014

In the News - October 16, 2014

Alaska Public Radio reported that when the new National Science Foundation research vessel Sikuliaq launches in a few months, it will be equipped with about a half-dozen Arctic Native ice testing sticks.

Climate change and polar bears

This week, world leaders met in New York for the U.N. Climate Summit to advance climate action. Concurrently, the New York Times and other media outlets published a series of stories and video about the impacts of a warming Arctic.

Lessons From An Advancing Alaskan Glacier

Lessons From An Advancing Alaskan Glacier

There’s nothing Professor Martin Truffer (UAF) likes better than working in his own back yard and, thankfully, Alaska is a big back yard. A veteran of glacier studies in Antarctica and Greenland, he’s happy to bring it home in his new three-year project funded by the National Science Foundation.

Unlocking the Past for Clues to the Future of Greenland’s Ice Sheet

Unlocking the Past for Clues to the Future of Greenland’s Ice Sheet

What can the past tell us about the future? That’s the question ice core specialist Erich Osterberg and a team of scientists is trying to answer. Their project, Response of the Northwest Greenland Cryosphere to Holocene Climate Change, is supported by the National Science Foundation.

Recap: Joint Science Education Project 2014

Recap: Joint Science Education Project 2014

Earlier this summer, Lynn Foshee Reed, organizer of Arctic Science Education Week, sent us a recap of the Joint Science Education Project (JSEP) 2014.

Oil, Conservation & Hunting Rights in the Chukchi Sea

Oil, Conservation & Hunting Rights in the Chukchi Sea

At first blush, there is not a lot in common between eider ducks and increased oil production off the coast of Alaska’s Chukchi Sea. But look a little deeper and you’ll discover that the researchers’ work on water birds is a key component in engaging Native communities in northern Alaska.